The AMiRESot Robot Soccer Tournament

 

The robots for the AMiRESot game are fully autonomous. There is no global vision system and communication with a field side computer is not necessary during the game. The referee gives whistle signals for starting, halting and stopping the game, and for announcing penalties for rule infringements. The robots need to recognise these whistle signals. Although the intention is that the robots have on-board vision, there are no restrictions as to what sensors can be used as long as they do not interfere with similar sensors on the other players.

 

The main characterisitic of AMiRESot is the limitation on the size of the robot soccer players to a diameter of less than 110 mm. This allows the field of play to be small enough to not require a large space. The playfield can be quickly and easily set up in the home, the school or small university laboratory or corridor. The ball is a squash or golf ball. The AMiRESot game can be played by teams of 1 or more robots each, as long as the contending teams have the same number of players. Reasonable team sizes would be 1,3 or 5 players.

 

The guidelines for the AMiRE Soccer Tournament (AMiRESot 2008) rules 2008 were conceived at the workshop held at the 4th AMiRE Symposium in Buenos Aires in October 2007 with the objective to push autonomous minirobot technology another quantum step further while keeping the tournament affordable. The contribution of the attendants at the workshop is acknowledged and greatly appreciated by the authors of this document.

 

The tournament is intended for wheeled robots, because wheeled robots are easier and cheaper to build than humanoid walking robots. Wheeled robots are as useful as humanoid robots for developing all the necessary real time environment perception capabilities and cooperative behaviours required for a soccer game with a high level of realism.

 

The AMiRESot 2008 rules follow the FIFA Laws as close as it makes sense for the type of robot players and the field of play described herein.

 

For more information email support@amiresymposia.org or visit www.amiresymposia.org